Kiwi duo set to transform contactless payments

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Shane Marsh and James McEniery are two kiwis who, due to Covid-19 returned home to New Zealand from Singapore.

The pair have just launched a digital wallet which they believe will enable individuals and businesses alike to make contactless payments.

Their app called “Dosh,” a colloquialism for money, instant payments to businesses for goods and services.

Previously, making a payment required required a person to enter a 16 digit bank account number into their online banking platform, then there would be a delay for the funds to clear.
Users can now download the Dosh app for free and transfer funds from their bank account to their digital wallet. Funds can then be transferred when payments need to be made to another person or business.

“The app would allow payments to be made using either a mobile number or QR code that could be scanned at the counter of a merchant or on their bill,” says Marsh.
The wallet can store up to $1,000.00, with a maximum transaction of $500.00.

Marsh said they are targeting small businesses who might be struggling to provide contactless payment in the current lockdown. He also expected the take-up to be strong among social groups of friends or flatmates.

“I see a lot of people are putting up notes on their shop windows with their bank account details and asking people to send them photos of the transactions but with Dosh you can use your business QR code and have that on the company website or invoice or counter and people can just scan it and pay it,” says Marsh.

“Where Dosh can really fill a gap in the marketplace is really with those small SMEs who are standalone independent and don’t have standalone sophisticated payment options today. That will be our focus.”

They plan to start the service with just payments then expand it over time, adding services for micro-investing, insurance services and buy now pay later.
“Our objective is to be a leading financial services provider in New Zealand so the offering will expand much beyond payments.”

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